Video 30 Jul

Android L has designers dreaming of Android Design with cleaner UX and UI patterns. It is a beautiful thing.

Video 29 Jul 9,588 notes

instagram:

Seeking Inspiration Midair with @manonwethly

To see more of Manon’s artfully captured images of #flyingstuff, follow @manonwethly.

For Dutch designer Manon Wethlij (@manonwethly), the contents of her arresting #flyingstuff photos are less important than the conversations they provoke. “People are free to see or feel whatever they want in the shapes,” Manon says. “I love that they make people talk to me and ask questions.”

“I studied architecture for two years, then graphic design, but the thing that has always made me happy is photography.” When she found Instagram, Manon says, “it was exactly what I needed to keep my photography enthusiasm alive. I was taking lots of photos every day and just storing them in my computer for no one to see.”

These days, it’s the response to her photos on Instagram that keeps Manon evolving creatively. “Everybody’s enthusiasm encourages me to try new things,” she explains, “It’s sort of addictive.”

Link 29 Jul 10 notes The Ideal Length of Everything Online, Backed by Research»

thehipperelement:

How long is the ideal blog post?

Which length of email subject line gets the most people to open it?

How wide should you design your paragraphs in a layout?

How long should a tweet be to maximize the chance of a retweet?

The linked article provides data (and visual graphs) to backup answers to each of these questions and more.

As you read it, try to keep in mind that the length of these things is not what creates the retweets or engagement.

It is people’s perception of the content because of the length, or that practical nature of those lengths.

And sometimes, as you will see, the length is totally irrelevant. 

Photo 24 Jul 170 notes 8bitfuture:

300 famous characters, in 8-bit.
By Paul Robertson.

Give it.

8bitfuture:

300 famous characters, in 8-bit.

By Paul Robertson.

Give it.

Photo 24 Jul 194 notes fastcompany:

You won’t recognize your dinner in 50 years (but don’t worry, it’s still food). 
Scientists have already proven it’s possible to grow a burger in the lab using a few cells from a cow. Someday, it might also be possible to grow food from fake plastic cells—and get all of the nutrition we need without relying on nature or a farm.
Read More>

Fascinating, but I hope I still get to enjoy food as a dining experience.

fastcompany:

You won’t recognize your dinner in 50 years (but don’t worry, it’s still food).

Scientists have already proven it’s possible to grow a burger in the lab using a few cells from a cow. Someday, it might also be possible to grow food from fake plastic cells—and get all of the nutrition we need without relying on nature or a farm.

Read More>

Fascinating, but I hope I still get to enjoy food as a dining experience.

via CO.DESIGN.
Video 24 Jul 529 notes
Photo 24 Jul 3,000 posts!
I did it.

3,000 posts!

I did it.

Text 24 Jul 44 notes Coming soon: Swarm for Windows Phone

foursquare:

Since we’ve announced the launch of Swarm, we’ve heard from a ton of Windows Phone fans about how excited you are to see the app come to a live tile near you. It’s almost ready for you, so we wanted to share a preview of what’s to come.

image

Until Swarm is out, you’ll be able to check in on Foursquare for Windows Phone. We’re putting on the finishing touches and will have it for you as soon as possible (in the next few weeks), so stay tuned!

 

Interesting, I usually see apps and by the time they get to Windows the UI is so substantially different, I almost feel immerse into a new environment. That is not the case with Swarm. Good or Bad?

Photo 24 Jul 6 notes dribbblepopular:

Delayed / On Time Original: http://ift.tt/1ujaf4d

dribbblepopular:

Delayed / On Time Original: http://ift.tt/1ujaf4d

Link 24 Jul 122 notes 20 New Yorker Design Stories To Read Now»

fastcodesign:

Curl up with your iPad while the archives are free

image

So far, the best thing about the New Yorker’s digital revamp is not the new site design, but rather the opening of the magazine’s storied archives. For the next three months, articles dating back to 2007 (plus select additional features) are free to all visitors, offering non-subscribers a chance to revisit some of the best design writing of the past decade.

Here are Co.Design’s picks for your weekend reading. 

via CO.DESIGN.

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